Posts filed under ‘Gilbert Real Estate’

Phoenix real estate market not weakening soon

Local economist expects Maricopa County’s economic boom to continue until at least 2023

For those who wonder when the Phoenix area’s increasing real estate prices might level off or decrease, most economic signs point to “not anytime soon.”

In a FOX-10 Phoenix news story earlier this month, Scottsdale economist Elliott Pollack said the local boom is likely to continue through “at least 2023.”

The report noted increased hiring among both existing and new businesses in Maricopa County is unrivaled in the nation in recent months.

Pollack said the Phoenix area was the best performing major employment market in the entire country last year. He told FOX-10 that among U.S. jobs added over the past last 10 years, 98 percent were lost nationwide in March and April 2020 as a result of the pandemic. During the same time period, Phoenix only lost 40 percent of such jobs. In the current rebound, the report added, the United States as a whole has recovered 55 percent of those jobs lost, while metro Phoenix has already recovered 75 percent.

“We’re in for an extraordinary period of growth,” predicted Pollack, thanks in part to Arizona’s business-friendly policies. “We expect Phoenix to continue to grow extremely rapidly over the next two to three years.

“Phoenix is structured right now to do better than virtually anybody else,” Pollack concluded.

How does the region’s economic performance affect its residential real estate market? With the continuing positive economic news and a growing number of jobs allowing work-from-home flexibility, Arizona’s weather and reasonable cost of living are drawing more and more people to move here from other states.

According to Pollack’s “Monday Morning Quarterback” newsletter, 1,479 new homes and 7,863 resales were sold in metro Phoenix in February. “Median resale price increased nearly 20 percent to $352,000 compared to the price of new homes at $379,900.”

Realtor.com’s most recent forecast predicts Valley home sales will increase 11.4 percent compared to last year – more than the national average.

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March 15, 2021 at 8:46 am Leave a comment

Legal advice offered on fix-and-flip properties

If you plan to sell a home after renovating or remodeling it — commonly known as a “fix-and-flip” property — a Valley lawyer recently offered a few tips on ensuring you don’t entice a lawsuit from the buyer after the sales contract is signed.

Attorney Patrick MacQueen, a 16 year veteran real estate lawyer of Macqueen and Gottlieb, PLC told a webinar audience this week that he has handled about 235 cases involving fix-and-flips in the past four years, accounting for approximately 40 percent of his client caseload.

There are five major allegations a buyer can accuse the parties involved with the sale, MacQueen said. The first is “common law fraud,” meaning an “outward statement” about the property’s condition that is “an out-and-out lie.”

The second is fraudulent misrepresentation is “fraud by omission,” MacQueen said, such as when a question about the property comes up, but the seller or seller’s agent “fails to say anything” despite a known problem with the home with respect to the question. Such can be the case of non-disclosure of mold in the property.

Third is “Consumer fraud” typically has to do with statements or representations made in advertising materials, MacQueen said. “For example, if the MLS listing says the home was a ‘complete remodel’ but not everything was redone,” he explained.

The fourth is “Negligent representation” which involves a statement made to the buyers about the subject property that you didn’t know was false, and the buyers relied on that information. For example, if the seller tells the buyer all needed permits were obtained in the construction of a major addition but one necessary permit was never granted, that would be negligent representation, MacQueen said.

MacQueen said he also sometimes sees breach of contract claims filed against sellers if a claim made by the seller in the signed contract is found to be untrue.

MacQueen said the best practice in selling a fix-and-flip property is to avoid adding superfluous “as-is” statements in the sales contract, because standard Arizona real estate contracts already include a standard as-is language.

Further, MacQueen urged that sellers “disclose what you know” in the Seller Property Disclosure Statement (SPDS) that is typically included in a sales contract, rather than try to avoid using the SPDS when they are selling a property they never occupied.

“Disclose everything,” when selling a fix-and-flip property, MacQueen concluded.

For a Buyer purchasing a fix-and-flip property, MacQueen offers advice. Conduct a third party inspection, request contractor information, warranty, receipts and confirm verbal representation via email through your Realtor. So, when the Seller claims that the contactor who completed electrical repair is licensed, have this confirmation in the form of an email.

Following these tips could reduce the risk of facing a potential and costly law suit.

July 14, 2020 at 4:26 pm Leave a comment


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